Catacombe dei Cappuccini Palermo

Sicily incentives catacombe dei cappuccini The Capuchin Catacombs of Palermo (also Catacombe dei Cappuccini or Catacombs of the Capuchins) are burial catacombs. Today they provide a somewhat macabre tourist attraction as well as an extraordinary historical record. Palermo’s Capuchin monastery outgrew its original cemetery in the 16th century and monks began to excavate crypts below it. In 1599 they mummified one of their number, recently dead brother Silvestro of Gubbio, and placed him into the catacombs. Sicily incentives catacombe dei cappuccini The bodies were dehydrated on the racks of ceramic pipes in the catacombs and sometimes later washed with vinegar. Some of the bodies were embalmed and others enclosed in sealed glass cabinets. Originally the catacombs were intended only for the dead friars. However, in the following centuries it became a status symbol to be entombed into the Capuchin catacombs. In their wills, local luminaries would ask to be preserved in certain clothes, or even to have their clothes changed at regular intervals. Priests wore their clerical vestments, others were clothed according to the contemporary fashion. Relatives would visit to pray for the deceased and also to maintain the body in presentable condition. Montalbano Elicona Sicily Incentives Sicily DMC Incentives, Palermo […]

Villa Tasca, Palermo: the out of the ordinary accommodation in Palermo

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The Palatine Chapel in Palermo (Cappella Palatina)(video)

The Palatine Chapel in Palermo (Cappella Palatina) Commenced by Roger II and consecrated in 1140. The Chapel is inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List. The Palatine Chapel is the royal chapel of the Norman kings of Kingdom of Sicily situated on the first floor at the center of the Norman Palace in Palermo. The chapel is a great symbol of multi-cultural cooperation. Craftsmen of three different religious traditions worked alongside each other. The madonna below Christ Pantocrator is an addition from the 18th century. Originally there was a window there. The Palatine Chapel, consecrated on Palm Sunday, 28 April, 1140, is inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List. The mosaics in the Palatine Chapel were probably made by the same craftsmen that made the mosaics in the Martorana and the central apse of the Cathedral in Cefalù. The wooden ceiling of star-shaped panels, carved and painted by 12th century craftsmen from Maghreb. Originally there were 50 windows (later blocked) designed to illuminate at all times of the day the stories told on the wall. The texts in the chapel are written in Greek, Arabic and Latin. The term “Normans” (“men from the North”) applied first to the people of Scandinavia in […]